Caryl Bryer Fallert-Gentry: 40 Years of Color, Light, & Motion

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Skylights, Caryl Bryer Fallert-Gentry

January 26–April 16, 2016

Reception: Thursday, January 28, 2016, 6–8:00 p.m

 
For as long as I can remember, I have expressed myself through artwork. My formal training was primarily in design, drawing, and studio painting. After many years of painting, sewing, and experimenting with other media, I discovered that fabric, as a fine art medium, best expressed my personal vision. Since 1982, I have been a quilt maker, i.e., my work is constructed from layers of fabric, stitched together with batting or other filler between the layers.

I love the tactile qualities of cloth, and the unlimited color range made possible by hand dyeing, and other surface design techniques. For twenty years, virtually all of my quilts begin with white, 100% cotton fabric. The fabric was dyed, painted and printed to create the palette of colors and visual texture used in piecing and appliquéing my images. In 2004 I began licensing some of my original painted and dyed designs to Benartex, for use in commercially screened fabrics, and many of the quilts since then have included these fabrics. I am also making a series of quilts from images scanned and manipulated in the computer and printed directly on fabric with archival ink jet inks.

The focus of my work is on the qualities of color, line, and texture, which will engage the spirit and emotions of the viewer, evoking a sense of mystery, excitement, or joy. Illusions of movement, depth, and luminosity are common to most of my work. The inner glow is created by hand dyeing or painting my fabrics in gradual progressions from light to dark.

Both my geometric color studies, and my more organic, curved seam abstracts are inspired by visual impressions, collected in my travels, in my everyday life, and in my imagination. Although some of my quilts include pictorial images, my work is most often about seeing, experiencing, and imagining, rather than pictorial representation of any specific object or species. When recognizable objects appear, they represent the emotions and flights of fantasy evoked by those objects. My intention is to focus on positive energy and depict that in my work.

I intend for my quilts to be seen and enjoyed by others. It is my hope that they will lift the spirits and delight the eyes of those who see them. I am constantly learning and my work evolves as I find new images in my imagination and develop the techniques to create them in cloth. As a teacher I believe that the magic of art lies in our heads and in our hearts. I love sharing my techniques with others so they can share their magic with me.

Kate Freeman Clark: A New Look at a National Treasure

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Image courtesy Kate Freeman Clark Art Gallery

August 11, 2015–February 20, 2016

Works from one of the 20th Century’s greatest landscape and plein-air painters.
Reception: Tuesday, August 25, 2015
6:00 –8:00 p.m.
Part of the Oxford Arts Crawl

Exhibition support from the Friends of the Museum.

Friends of the Museum

Peri Schwartz: Paintings • Drawings • Prints

schwartz_web

September 22, 2015–January 30, 2016

Reception: Tuesday, October 27, 2015, 5–8:00 p.m.
Part of the Oxford Arts Crawl

Peri Schwartz grew up in Far Rockaway, NY. She studied at Boston University’s School of Fine Arts and received an MFA at Queens College. She lives and works in New Rochelle, NY. In paintings, prints and drawings she focuses on composition and the interplay of color, light and space. Her work is in museum collections in the US and Europe. This exhibition will highlight her talents in several media.

perischwartz.com
pagebondgallery.com/artists/details/peri-schwartz
meadmusings.wordpress.com

Art-Crawl

Intervals and Disturbances by Ben Butler

Cloud-Morphology

Cloud Morphology

September 8–December 18, 2015

Opening Reception: Thursday, September 10, 2015, 6–8:00 p.m.

Part of the annual membership party

Intervals and Disturbances reflects the sensibility that an object stands as a momentary physical manifestation of an ongoing process. They provide evidence of unseen forces, and they point to the distinction between the human and the non-human. Throughout the natural world, unexpected complexity emerges from simple, persistent processes. When the order of things is not readily apparent, complexity is often mistaken for chaos. In the rush to comprehend we often miss the wonderful unseen forces at work. The response is to play in these boundaries between the simple and the complex, between the complex and the overwhelming.

V.I.P. Portrait Gallery by Andrzej Maciejewski

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May 26–September 5, 2015

Reception: Tuesday, May 26, 2015
 
Andrzej Maciejewski Artist Statement:

This series is a study of form, a collection of diverse shapes and textures. I have created many such collections and I often choose mundane objects, like in this case potatoes. This gives me the freedom to look at them in an abstract way or to interpret them on my own, without being limited by the overwhelming context, which often happens when you choose objects that are too obviously important or unusual. What drew me to potatoes in particular, was their commonly unappreciated diversity created by nature, not by human artfulness. For my potatoes, I chose to make portraits rather than simply still-lifes and I gave them names—not in order to suggest that they look like people, but simply to emphasize their individual uniqueness (names individualize, like numbers standardize). I used the large format camera and I printed them much larger than the life-size to show them like they were looked at through the magnifying glass—with attention to all the tiny, but meaningful details. Excluding the color factor by shooting them in black & white let me focus on shape, texture and light. The VIP in the title may be translated as Very Interesting Potatoes, or in many other ways.

 

part of the Oxford Arts Crawl
artcrawl

Brief Encounters by Martin Arnold

Lauren_web

March 10–May 16, 2015

Reception: Tuesday, March 24, 2015
This exhibit features figure paintings by Martin Arnold. As an artist, Arnold strives to create “a psychological mirror” with his almost life-sized oil paintings.

 

part of the Oxford Arts Crawl
Art-Crawl

Bloomingdale’s Fashion Touchdown

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August 1, 2014 – January 24, 2015

This exciting exhibit features one-of-a-kind football helmets, created by world-famous fashion designers for an auction to benefit the NFL Foundation. The University of Mississippi Museum acquired three helmets, featured in the exhibition with photographs of the remaining 45 helmets.

A Light Passage by Lee Renninger

BGarden4

August 26, 2014 – February 14, 2015

Opening Reception: Tuesday, August 26, 2014, 5 – 8:00 p.m.

Part of the Oxford Arts Crawl

A Light Passage features pieces from Botanica — a new body of work by Lee Renninger using elements of the garden to celebrate the wonder and mystery of the floral world.

Art-Crawl

H.C. Porter’s Blues @ Home

Blues at Home

April 1, 2014- August 2, 2014

Opening Reception: Thursday, April 3, 2014, 7:00–9:00 p.m.
with Live Music

Blues @ Home is H.C. Porter’s collection of 30 portrait paintings of Mississippi living blues legends in their at-home settings. The paintings are paired with oral histories that give insight into the storied lives of the legends.

Admission: $5

Sponsored by:
The Friends of the Museum
Madison Charitable Foundation

Friends of the Museum

Additional support provided by:
R&B Feder Charitable Foundation
The Student Activities Association
The Younger Foundation
UM Department of Music
Sally Barksdale Honors College
Fat Possum Records
T.H. Freeland IV, Esq.
The Brunt Family
Sid & Kathy Davis
Tom Davis State Insurance

The Figure: Portrait and Bronze Works by Tom Corbin

Molly

March 18, 2014- August 9, 2014

Opening Reception: Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 6:00–8:00 p.m.
Part of the Oxford Arts Crawl

Artist Lecture: Thursday, March 27, 2014, 7:00–9:00 p.m.

Bronze sculptor, furniture designer and painter, Tom Corbin, will give a lecture about his work and career in art. He will describe how, as a self-taught artist, he carved out a unique niche in the art and design world. Inspired by the iconography of youth, whimsy and nostalgia, Corbin’s work includes bronze sculptures and paintings with the female figure being his primary muse.

Click here to read more about The Figure: Portrait and Bronze Works by Tom Corbin.

Exhibition support from the Friends of the Museum. 

Friends of the Museum        Art-Crawl