Jacob Hashimoto

The Other Sun

The Other Sun by Jacob Hashimoto

The Other Sun

 

AUGUST 17, 2021 – AUGUST 20, 2022

Reception and Artist Lecture has been postponed until Spring 2022

Whether it be small intricate drawings or massive hovering forms consisting of thousands of kite-like discs, Jacob Hashimoto playfully balances the dichotomies he observes in landscapes and constructed virtual worlds. Exhibit is on view at both the University Museum and Rowan Oak.

The Tradition of African American Quilt-Making


Southern African American quilts are one of the purest forms of southern folk art. It is a craft handed down for generations, often done communally, that represents family, region, and the love of its maker/s. Born from necessity, where resources are limited, it is a way to reuse scraps of cloth. Although most quilters typically adhere to patterns, the competitive spirit of southern folk artists often sparked spontaneity, experimentation, and creative choices in color and print that manifested into individual artistic voices.

Dreams and Visions

Angel's request by Theora Hamblett

Angel’s Request #2, 1956.

“Parents didn’t like for their children to play ball games Saturday afternoon. That was too against Belief. And Mama fussin, I went to the fireplace to get a hot iron. I picked up the hot iron and went back to the ironing board and began ironing and I heard a noise. And I looked up right in front of me and there was an angel. It was papa. As I saw him in lights, only he was white with large white angel wings and grey robe, with both hands extended out towards me, and the right one nearer me and he says “Baby”. I had said I was going too [to the ball game]. And he says, “Baby, for my sake, don’t go.” So I didn’t. Of course I didn’t go. But, that vision was a big guiding in my life. After that, when I needed to make a decision, I would get off to myself and wonder, would papa be pleased with what I was doing? And really I think what I am today is from that.”

—THEORA HAMBLETT

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Theora Alton Hamblett was born and raised in Paris, Mississippi, and lived the latter part of her 80-year life in Oxford. A schoolteacher by training, she had a lifelong interest in art, but didn’t begin painting until age 55. Hamblett passed away in 1977 after gaining fame throughout the nation as a self- taught artist who’s brightly colored paintings of children’s games and childhood memories had universal appeal.

A Conversation with; Theora Hamblett link to video with Hamblett's photoLesser known are Hamblett’s religious paintings inspired by the dreams and visions she experienced during her last 25 years. This third category of her work was considered by the artist to be her most important work, therefore she preferred to keep most of the paintings rather than exhibiting them for profit. When Hamblett bequeathed her collection to the University of Mississippi, she gave explicit instructions that her religious paintings be given priority over all her other works in terms of exhibition, conservation, and scholarly study.

“she saw a vision of her brother with ‘shining eyes of glory’”

On the morning of July 3, 1971, Theora Hamblett received a phone call notifying her that her older brother Hubert had suffered a heart attack, but was stable. Despite reassurances, Theora spent the day anxiously pacing between three rooms of her house. As the day turned to evening, her pacing continued until, while turning into a room, she saw a vision of her brother with “shining eyes of glory”. Believing that this vision meant her brother had passed Theora spent the rest of the evening crying on her bed. Then between 10-11:00 pm, she received another phone call confirming her greatest fear that Hubert had indeed died.

Several weeks later, following the funeral, she painted this vision of Hubert she saw the day he died.

The tea towel is an addition made by Theora Hamblett to ceremoniously uncover and cover him daily.

Hubert, #137, 1971, Theora Hamblett Dreams and Visions Series
Oil on canvas, H: 38 ½”; W. 30 ⅛”
Bequest of Theora Hamblett, 1977.012.0174, 1956.

Hamblett’s overarching concern for this work can be attributed to the spirituality of her youth, a permutation that Protestantism scholars have dubbed Popular Southern Evangelicalism. The belief that her psychic episodes were religious experiences was therefore partially conditioned by the prevalence of such views within her early churches, but also latter collectors of this category. Five years after she began painting, the Museum of Modern Art acquired one of her dream paintings and changed the title of her work from The Golden Gate to The Vision. Listen to Theora discuss the Museum of Modern Art acquisition here.

Theora Hamblett’s work remains influential in contemporary southern art. The University of Mississippi Museum is proud to be the stewards of the majority of her art.